Food design & research > Test systems

Automated GI and RS prediction in food

03 November, 2008

The CSIRO initiated Food Futures Flagship has developed an automated instrument for accurately predicting glycemic index (GI) and resistant starch (RS) in food products.


Processed food eaters leave better fingerprints

22 September, 2008

The sweat of processed food eaters contains more salt and so their fingerprints are more corrosive and easier to detect.


Keeping shellfish safe

05 September, 2008

An efficient, accurate and sensitive method of detecting toxins in shellfish has been validated for worldwide acceptance in a project completed by the IRL-initiated Virtual Institute for Metrology in Chemistry and Biology, in collaboration with the Cawthron Institute.


A new approach to taste testing

13 June, 2008

Using the same concept behind commercial breath-freshening strips, a researcher has developed a new, easier method for clinical taste testing.


Brucellosis detection and characterisation

02 April, 2008

Researchers at the University of Navarra have launched a product for the detection and characterisation of the Brucella bacteria, which is the causative agent for brucellosis.


Food testing at Beijing Olympics

12 November, 2007

While the world’s athletes train for the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, an American microbiologist has helped direct the international spotlight onto the host country’s food safety practices.


Group formed to promote biological agriculture

26 April, 2006

The Biological Farmers of Australia has formed a sub committee to promote the principles, benefits and good practices of biological agriculture.


Meat analysis

22 April, 2005

The Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service (AQIS) has approved both the Foss MeatMaster and Foss FoodScan for the determination of percentage Chemical Lean (fat content) in export beef trimmings, under the Export Meat Orders Schedule 2 - Part 2 (1.3).


Tests for nuts

13 January, 2005

Scientists at Florida State University subjected walnuts, cashew nuts and almonds to radiation, roasting, pressure cooking, blanching, frying and microwave heating in an effort to make them safe for allergy sufferers.


Differences between organic and conventional produce found

10 January, 2005

New research on specific sample groups shows some organic produce may have an added health benefit over conventionally grown counterparts, according to researchers presenting at the Institute of Food Technologists Annual Meeting and Food Expo. But inherent inconsistencies associated with organic farming make general comparisons inappropriate.


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