Nestlé institute for packaging research opens


Monday, 23 September, 2019


Nestlé institute for packaging research opens

Nestlé has officially opened its Institute of Packaging Sciences to help bring functional, safe and environmentally friendly packaging solutions to the market and address the plastic packaging waste issue.

Designed to help Nestlé achieve its commitment to make 100% of its packaging recyclable or re-usable by 2025, the institute will focus on areas pertaining to science and technology, such as refillable or reusable packaging, simplified packaging materials, recycled packaging materials, high-performance barrier papers and bio-based, compostable and biodegradable materials.

In close collaboration with the company’s global R&D network, academic partners, suppliers and start-ups, the institute will evaluate the safety and functionality of various sustainable packaging materials. Research focus areas will include recyclable, biodegradable or compostable polymers, functional paper, as well as new packaging concepts and technologies to increase the recyclability of plastic packaging. The new solutions will be tested in various product categories, before they are rolled out across Nestlé’s global portfolio.

“Our vision is a world in which none of our packaging ends up in landfill or as litter. To achieve this we introduce re-usable packaging solutions and pioneer environmentally friendly packaging materials. Furthermore, we support the development of local recycling infrastructure and deposit schemes to help shape a waste-free world. The Nestlé Institute of Packaging Sciences enables us to create a strong pipeline of sustainable packaging solutions for Nestlé products across businesses and markets,” said Mark Schneider, Nestlé CEO.

Located in Lausanne, Switzerland, the institute will employ around 50 people and include a state-of-the-art laboratory complex as well as facilities for rapid prototyping.

Image credit: ©stock.adobe.com/au/mipan

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