Nestlé's Irish R&D centre to focus on infant nutrition


Wednesday, 23 January, 2019


Nestlé's Irish R&D centre to focus on infant nutrition

Nestlé has opened its first research and development centre in Ireland, which will focus on scientific research to support innovations in the development of milk-based maternal and infant nutrition products for the global market.

The opening of the centre marks the completion of a three-year building program with a capital investment of €27 million, which was supported by Enterprise Ireland.

Co-located with Nestlé’s Wyeth Nutrition manufacturing plant in Limerick, the R&D centre employs over 40 research staff and will concentrate on developing premium, science-based products for mothers and infants. It incorporates state-of-the-art laboratory facilities as well as a full pilot-scale manufacturing line to facilitate the development and testing of new products from initial concept through to product deployment.

“Our Irish R&D centre will benefit from Nestlé’s global R&D network and help to position Nestlé at the fore of infant and maternal nutritional product development, one of Nestlé’s most important growth drivers,” said Thomas Hauser, Head of Global Product and Technology Development for Nestlé S.A. “With this new centre, we will increase the pace of our innovation capacity by enabling our scientists to explore innovative nutritional solutions for the crucial first 1000 days of life.”

Dan O’Callaghan, Head of the new R&D centre, stated: “Between our pilot plant and laboratories, we have installed state-of-the-art food processing equipment and analytical instruments. We will also complement our in-house activities through collaborative research programs with Irish universities and with Teagasc — the Agriculture and Food Development Authority. This will enable our cross-functional team of research scientists to develop the next wave of innovative nutritional products to meet the demands of future generations.”

Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine Michael Creed, who formally opened the centre, said this is “a strategically important investment for Ireland” and is “a major signal of confidence in the future and quality of the Irish dairy industry”.

Image credit: ©stock.adobe.com/au/michaeljung

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