Hygienic Engineering Design Group branches out to Australia


Friday, 11 October, 2019


Hygienic Engineering Design Group branches out to Australia

Founded in 1989, the European Hygienic Engineering Design Group (EHEDG) is a non-profit foundation with a principal goal to promote safe food by improving hygienic engineering and design in all aspects of a food manufacturing supply chain. The group has contributed to a safer food production on a global scale by helping to improve the cleanability and food safety of industrial processing and packaging installations.

The organisation encourages membership engagement from individuals, companies and educational institutes to work towards this common outcome and currently has over 500 global company members and 35 established regional sectors around the world.

With the inclusion of the Australian regional sector in 2019, the Australian food manufacturing industry will now have greater access to the benefits that EHEDG can bring to the food industry locally.

The organisation provides guidelines, training and certification programs, supporting the food industry to design, install and validate equipment, contributing to food safety. It aims to help members: improve process safety and sustainability; safeguard regulatory compliance; minimise food safety risks; reduce lifecycle costs; protect food quality; maximise production time; create new business opportunities; and exchange know-how and best practice.

The newly established Australian Regional Board of EHEDG Australia comprises: Chair — Rick De Sousa (RDS Technical Services); Co-Chair — Jasmine Lacis-Lee (DTS Food Assurance); board members — Dr Catherine Collins (University of NSW), Arthur Seiler (Wiley, The Project Delivery Company), Liz Sharrock (WR&D Wells) and Karin Blacow (Commercial Food Sanitation).

The Australian regional sector has indicated it will be planning events in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane in 2020.

To find out more about EHEDG, visit www.ehedg.org.

Image credit: ©stock.adobe.com/au/romankrykh

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